Tastemakers Feature In Farfetch.com's New Food Book

BY Harper's Bazaar Interiors / Oct 25 2015 / 14:47 PM

A new book from Farfetch and Assouline presents a curated collection of food and fashion recommendations by the world’s foremost tastemakers

Tastemakers Feature In Farfetch.com's New Food Book
Leandra Medine
Tastemakers Feature In Farfetch.com's New Food Book
Dhs92, Assouline
Tastemakers Feature In Farfetch.com's New Food Book
Leandra Medine
Tastemakers Feature In Farfetch.com's New Food Book
A dish by Faviiken in Sweden
Tastemakers Feature In Farfetch.com's New Food Book
Douglas Ng's fishball noodles from Fishball Story in Singapore
Tastemakers Feature In Farfetch.com's New Food Book
Salad of grass-fed Wagyu beef, rock samphire and Otway shiitake at Brae in Birregurra, Australia

When travelling, who hasn’t relied on the expertise of that effortlessly fashionable friend? One who always knows the best places to explore, shop and eat out, in their native city? Assouline’s latest pocketbook, Farfetch Curates Food, is a culinary take on the ‘little black book’, a curated collection of recommendations by some of the world’s most fashionable tastemakers, chefs, mixologists, gallerists and boutique owners. This is the first in a series of three books by luxury e-tailer Farfetch.com, our go-to for designer men’s and womenswear, with each petite hardback exploring a different topic – food, design and art. Part culinary guide and part inspirational travel journal, the first book picks up on two of the most au courant of trends: self-curation and all things epicurean. In the forward by fashion critic Tim Blanks, he describes how the advent of the internet age has led to the democratisation of curation, where anyone with a phone and a following can broadcast their opinions. He writes: “Once, curation was a specialist expertise largely confined to the art world. Now, technology has turned everyone into curators. But the Internet – The Great Leveller – has replaced expertise with the force of personality. That’s now the hook you need to fish authoritative opinion out of the bottomless ocean of information that the Web has unleased.” Indeed, the book does lean quite heavily on the musings and recommendations of trendsetters with sizable social media followings within its 96 pages. Elettra Wiedmann – model, socialite, Vogue v-log presenter and author of the healthy eating blog, Impatient Foodie – shares her breakfast tips and recipe for the perfect omelette to kick-start the day. “I want to make smart food choices, but I have a busy and demanding life,” writes Elettra. “[My blog] is more of a journal, and it helps me to figure out how to balance my food desires with my life constraints.” 

It’s the kind of information that fashion nomads trade like stocks and bonds

Man Repeller’s Leandra Medine lists her favourite New York City lunch spots replete with sartorial recommendations (enjoy the quinoa salad at Sant Ambroeus in SoHo wearing ivory leather culottes and a white blouse, suggests the fashionista). Fauchon-trained pastry chef and owner of L’Eclaire de Genie, Christophe Adam, reveals his ambitions to open patisseries in Dubai, Tokyo, Switzerland and New York, introducing the world to his signature éclair flavours, such as lemon meringue and salted caramel. But that’s not to say the book does not delve deeper in the connection between food and culture. KF Seetoh chronicles a new generation of Singapore’s famous street food hawkers, who are reinventing the businesses while staying true to this historical tradition. “The hawker movement began fifty years ago, when travelling street food vendors were relocated from their often dilapidated areas to permanent residences, known as hawker centres,” he says. “Originally created to reduce environmental harm, they produced an unintended but agreeable effect – the preservation of Singapore’s migrant comfort food culture. At any one time, there are sellers offering Chinese, Indian, Malay, Nonya, British, Japanese and Singapore street food.” Yasuko Furuta, the designer behind the cult Japanese label Toga, takes readers on a vegetarian tour in pescatarian-focused Tokyo, where much can get lost in translation. “Does fish count as vegetarian?,” is a question Yasuko hears from waiters more often than she’d like in a city where there are “1,000 rules on how to slice salmon, and one blue fin tuna can fetch Dhs998,000”. Chefs Blaine Wetzel, Magnus Nilsson, Dan Hunter and Kobe Desramaults discuss how the latest gastro-trend of foraging, the pursuit of hyper-local ingredients, has transformed their respective establishments in the U.S., Sweden, Australia and Belgium into sites of food pilgrimages. “We cook in direct relation to nature, time, and place,” says Wetzel, “using only ingredients that are the freshest and at their peak on the island that day – from bright wild berries in the spring, to the many varieties of mushrooms in the fall, and everything in between.” It is these insightful anecdotes that point to fashion and food’s versatility as universal languages, which makes the book more than just something ornamental. The graphic layout and bright colours keep readers engaged. The food photography and illustrations, in Farfetch’s slightly mod-ish style, are mesmerising. Scattered throughout are titbits of information which point towards a global movements towards more informed, passionate and fashionable eating. As Tim describes, “a restaurant find is the natural concomitant of a backstreet retail discovery. It’s the kind of information that fashion nomads trade like stocks and bonds. And that is, in fact, a curatorial activity.”

Words: Nausheen Noor. This article first appeared in the September/October 2015 issue of Harper's Bazaar Interiors