Harper’s Bazaar Interiors Awards 2016: Meet The Judges

Harper's Bazaar Interiors, Harper's Bazaar Interiors Awards 2015
Meet a repertoire of our judges from the third edition of the Harper's Bazaar Interiors Awards. Here, they reveal the prestige of judging on the panel, their current projects and design trends on their radar

 Khalid Shafar, founder of KASA Space 

Harper’s Bazaar Interiors: Why is it important for you to be on the panel of judges for the annual Harper’s Bazaar Interiors Awards?

Khalid Shafar: I believe in sharing my insights with the industry through different approaches – judging prestigious awards like the Harper’s Bazaar Interiors Awards is one of which. I am very honoured to be selected to judge the work of some of the best and leaders of the industry.

HBI: What are you most looking forward to leading up to the Harper’s Bazaar Interiors Awards this year?

KS: I think we all are keen to know who will make it to the winners list this year, but I am also keen to know who are the newcomers to the industry in certain categories.

HBI: Are there any particular design trends this season which are on your radar?

KS: I am interested in the various weaving styles with different materials. Something I will introduce somehow in my new collection and work.

HBI: Can you describe the concept behind your project Button Up, which was presented at KASA Space during Dubai Design Week this year?

KS: The collection is an adaptation of the Khalid Shafar signature pattern woven in the Afghani Kilim weaving style. The collection’s button-up design was influenced by fashion garments such as the formal shirt. The use of large wooden buttons, handcrafted from teak, enables the joining of any two rugs of the collection, or all three together to form a larger single piece. Apart from the conspicuous buttons and to further highlight the design, part of the pattern in each rug has been left unshaved to demonstrate the 3D levels of the pattern; more specifically each rug showcases an elevated Burj Khalifa design.


Nadine Kanso, photographer and jewellery designer, Bil Arabi

Harper’s Bazaar Interiors: Why is it important for you to be on the judges’ panel for the annual Harper’s Bazaar Interiors Awards?

Nadine Kanso: When you reach a certain stage in your career as a designer, being part of such a talented group of judges alongside such a reputable publication, you feel your work and reputation as a designer is appreciated and people believe in your brand and your expertise opinion.

HBI: What are you most looking forward to leading up to the Harper's Bazaar Interiors Awards this year?

NK: It is refreshing to see both regional and international brands compete on such an important platform, where designers and brands can showcase and be known for their work and creations. The Harper’s Bazaar Interiors Awards have continuously supported the growth of regional talent and this is an area which I am personally very passionate about.

HBI: Are there any particular design trends this season which are on your radar?

NK: Working and combining different materials through unconventional ways, where designers are able to go out of the box and challenge industry trends is something we are seeing more of this year. This was very eminent in the design scene in Milan last season and has made its way to the regional design scene. I am a founding member of DRAK, a regional design initiative, and the main theme around this year’s exhibition is the use of wood showcased in an unconventional and interactive output.

HBI: What current projects are you working on which you would like to share with our readers?

NK: I have just finished releasing two collections, celebrating the brand’s 10 year anniversary, alongside my exhibition at Dubai Design Week. I have a lot of exciting collaborations in the pipeline, which will be revealed very soon.


Guillaume Cuiry, Director at La Galerie Nationale

Harper’s Bazaar Interiors: Why is it important for you to be on the jury of the Harper’s Bazaar Interiors Awards?

Guillaume Cuiry: For me, being a member of the Harper’s Bazaar Interiors Awards jury is not a trivial thing. It's a big responsibility. We will reward the work done by experienced professionals or amateurs. I attach a personal importance to the creation and respect for the geographical and cultural context of our region.

HBI: What are you most looking forward to leading up to the Harper's Bazaar Interiors this year?

GC: I expect to be surprised by the designers of the proposed projects, but I do not forget that the functionality of these is essential. Never lose the final ‘Customer Review’ viewpoint, it is this that must be met.

HBI: Are there any particular design trends this season that are on your radar?

GC: I noticed that in recent years there in a trend in designers reinterpreting historical standards. For me it’s good because I love the vintage style. I am also glad to see more colours and more innovation. I am rather doubtful  of this race to technology or the integration of new materials that do not necessarily bring much more and significantly increase the final price.

HBI: What inspired you to create The Apartment which is showcased at the La Galerie Nationale?

GC: The Apartment is an extension of my own home. What I found in Dubai are people who enjoyed this kind of decorum – a mix of objects from different periods, from different designers of the 20th century, and enjoyed the ambiance created. I decided to recreate the atmosphere in the space of La Galerie Nationale and help my visitors to understand and appreciate the modernity of that period and, above all, to dare to appropriate it. It’s also a simple way to educate our public. The concept is innovative and has been met with wide success.


David T’Kint, Partner at Hirsch Bedner Associates (HBA)

Harper’s Bazaar Interiors: Why is it important for you to be on the judges’ panel for the annual Harper’s Bazaar Interiors Awards?

David T’Kint: Harper’s Bazaar is a unique reference in the creative industry and is known worldwide. It is an honour to have my opinion solicited and to participate in the constant development of the world of design in the Middle East.

HBI: What are you most looking forward to leading up to the Harper's Bazaar Interiors Awards this year?

DT: I am looking forward to discovering what is new from the region, as well as to the exposure of the new design trends from other parts of the world coming to the Middle East.

HBI: Are there any particular design trends this season which are on your radar?

DT: For a long time in the Middle East, only the upper luxury tier of design would get attention, leaving the upper class and mid tiers somewhat unattended to and often quite basic. This has changed and I am looking forward to seeing the latest creative outputs from the entire spectrum.

HBI: What current projects are you working on which you would like to share with our readers?

DT: The Kempinski Summerland Beirut which just opened as well as upcoming openings in Qatar, China and Congo DRC are on the radar.  We are also currently working on exciting projects on the Palm, on Sheikh Zayed Road, in Business Bay – in addition to other works in Saudi Arabia, Oman, Jordan, China, Indonesia, as well as the UK.


Cast your votes for the third edition of Harper's Bazaar Interiors Awards at harpersbazaararabia.com/interiors/awards

BY

Harper's Bazaar Interiors, Harper's Bazaar Interiors Awards 2015