Sharjah Museum Of Islamic Civilisation Showcases Ottoman Treasures

BY Tanika D'souza / Nov 22 2016 / 21:36 PM

Spectacle and Splendour: Ottoman Masterpieces from the Museum of Applied Arts in Budapest is unveiled at the Sharjah Museum of Islamic Civilisation

Sharjah Museum Of Islamic Civilisation Showcases Ottoman Treasures
Ceremonial saddle. Royal Hungary Mid-11th century H/mid-17th century AD. Wood, velvet, silver and silver-gilt wire, engraved fire-gilt silver sheets, turquoises and leather and birch lining. L: 700 mm, W: 610 mm, saddle skirt: 780 x 1160 mm Inv. 52.2857.1
Sharjah Museum Of Islamic Civilisation Showcases Ottoman Treasures
Upper coat (mente) for a child. Ottoman Turkish silk lampas; Hungarian cut. Second half of 10th century H/second half of 16th century AD. Silk fabric patterned with silver thread, brocaded with silver-gilt and silk thread (lampas, kemha); buttons missing. L: 640 mm Inv. 64.40
Sharjah Museum Of Islamic Civilisation Showcases Ottoman Treasures
Ceremonial dagger. Ottoman Turkish, Istanbul. Sheath, cross-guard and hilt: early 11th century H/early17th century AD. Blade: second half of 10th century H/second half of 16th century AD. Steel, wood, gold; punched, chased and inlaid with mounted emeralds, rubies, turquoises. L: 350 mm, blade W: 28 mm. Inv. E. 61.5.1–2

Comprising a collection of priceless Islamic artefacts originating from 16th-17th century Hungary, Spectacle and Splendour – Ottoman Masterpieces from the Museum of Applied Arts in Budapest, displays exquisite examples of early Ottoman craftsmanship, including embroidered luxury textiles, bejewelled ceremonial weapons and elaborately crafted horse saddles. The rare pieces present visitors with a window into the powerful and sophisticated lives of Ottoman and Hungarian elites some 500 years ago, as well as provide a unique insight into methods of workmanship perfected by local craftsmen at the time. The exhibition captures a period of Hungarian history traversing the central and southern regions of the country – once under the Ottoman rule – to secure the finest items from workshops in order to display their power, authority and sophistication.

The exhibition runs until January, 19, 2017. For further information on the Sharjah Museum of Islamic Civilisation click here