The Real-Life Benefits Of Being Fashionably Late

Fashionably Late, Healthy, Optimistic, Late
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It apparently makes you a more creative and optimistic person.

Our society is intrinsically built on timeliness, and if you're always late, it likely doesn't sit well with those around you.

Garnering a reputation for tardiness isn't exactly seen a positive thing—whether amongst professional circles, or with your friends and family.
But while running behind schedule is socially frowned upon, new research could prove that lateness might actually be a benefit to your life, in more ways than one.

For starters, occasional lateness is said to boost your optimism, making you a more desirable (and therefore, more successful) person in your chosen field. Per the website Stylist, industry site Business Insider reported in 2016 that those who are renowned for their lateness are actually more optimistic people, and more desired in their line of work.

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The website cited a study from the 1950s, based on two different personality groups (who they refer to as 'Type A' and 'Type B'). The study inferred that Type B people are much more relaxed than rigid Type A people are.

If you're a relaxed Type B person, like the study says, you probably have a more positive view of the world, which leads to thinking you can fit more into your day than you actually can. Hence, the occasional lateness.

You don't have to dig deep to uncover the benefits of an optimistic, stress-free lifestyle on our general health. According to a widely-published 2008 study by Harvard University, optimism can benefit your heart health, and render you more resistant to all kinds of sicknesses.

Basically, don't be hard on yourself if you stumble in to the office a little behind schedule. It's not as bad as you think.


From Harper's BAZAAR Australia 

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Fashionably Late, Healthy, Optimistic, Late
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