Cartier's Latest Campaign Is Inspired By The Middle East

BY Milli Midwood / May 25 2017 / 15:46 PM

Celebrating the history and modernity of the Gulf with images from Jacques Cartier's archives

Cartier's Latest Campaign Is Inspired By The Middle East
Cartier Archives © Cartier
Jacques Cartier's trip in 1911. Shaikh Khalifa's hunting camp between burail mound south of the A'ali village.
Cartier's Latest Campaign Is Inspired By The Middle East
Nick Welsh, Cartier Collection © Cartier
Bandeau. Cartier Paris, special order 1923. Platinum. Cushion-shaped and round old-cut diamonds.
Cartier's Latest Campaign Is Inspired By The Middle East
Vincent Wulveryck © Cartier
Ring - yellow gold, one 28.48-carat cabochon-cut citrine, citrines, green tourmalines, onyx, rubellites, brilliant-cut diamonds.
Cartier's Latest Campaign Is Inspired By The Middle East
Nils Herrmann, Cartier Collection © Cartier
Cigarette case. Cartier Paris, 1913.
Cartier's Latest Campaign Is Inspired By The Middle East
Cartier Archives © Cartier
Pearl diving. Photo taken from Jacques Cartier's journey book to Bahrain in 1911
Cartier's Latest Campaign Is Inspired By The Middle East
Cartier Archives © Cartier
Jacques Cartier's trip in 1911. The Royal Mound of A'ali. Recorded from west from on top of Mound E looking into the excavated of Prideaux in 1906-07.
Cartier's Latest Campaign Is Inspired By The Middle East
Archives Cartier Paris © Cartier
Design for a vanity case. Cartier Paris, 1924. Executed in gold, enamel, onyx, mother-of-pearl, turquoises, pearls and diamonds. Graphite, Indian ink and gouache on tracing paper 22,8 x 12 cm Inv.

Inspired by Jacques Cartier’s first trip to the Middle East in 1912, the fine jewellery brand have launched a beautiful campaign to celebrate Ramadan and Eid inspired by the history and modernity of the Gulf. 'The Pursuit of Magnificence' campaign is comprised of an array of pieces from Cartier's archives, from jewellery to cigarette holders to original sketches, and aims to reflect the relationship of Maison Cartier with the region. 

Cartier

Jacques Cartier's trip in 1911. The Royal Mound of A'ali. Unidentified burial mounds.

Cartier Archives © Cartier

The campaign stemmed from a journal kept by the French explorer at the turn of the 20th century, where he chronicled his voyage visiting local shops, residences and places of worships, from The Al-Khamis Mosque in Bilad Al Qadeem to the House of Mugbil Al Thukair, a well-known pearl merchant in Bahrain.

Cartier

Brooch-pendant. Cartier Paris, 1913. Platinum. Single- and rose-cut diamonds. Sapphire cabochons. One natural pearl. Turquoise cabochons. Nine hinged jade plaques.

Photo: Nick Welsh, Cartier Collection © Cartier

An excerpt of Jacques Cartier’s journal from Muscat, 9 March 1912 reads, “I saw the phosphorescent sea. From the captain’s bridge, the two waves shaped by the ship’s bow were so blue it looked as though they were being illuminated from below. The whole boat was encircled by a luminous band and everywhere you looked fish left their zigzag trails through the water’s surface. It was like fireworks on the surface of the sea. We also get clear sight of the city of Moharrek and further in the distance the villages of Sathin and Dir, which look like small islands but, in actual fact, are only separated from Moharrek by dunes.”

Cartier

Jacques Cartier's trip in 1911.

Cartier Archives © Cartier

Now, inspired by Jacques’ fascination, curiosity and respect for the cultural traditions of the locals, Cartier have also created a film on the subject, which will be released in three chapters, bringing the story of Jacques Cartier to life.