Revisiting Maje Founder Judith Milgrom's Childhood In Morocco

In celebration of the brand’s 20th anniversary, Maje’s S/S18 campaign re-visits founder Judith Milgrom’s Moroccan childhood
The fashion brand celebrates its 20th anniversary with a Spring/Summer 2018 campaign reflecting Milgrom's memories growing up in the Middle East

Known for its focus on classic luxury with that quintessential Parisian je ne sais quoi, Maje has been a staple in It Girls’ wardrobe since its inception by founder Judith Milgrom in 2008. To continue its story into its third decade, the brand has looked into the future and drawn from the next generation of creatives to realise this new campaign.

Revolving around three themes – friendship in Morocco, family life in Paris, and love in England – Maje pays tribute to the Maje women, to the brand’s roots, and to its anticipated future. Model Yasmin Wijnaldum embodies the three aspects of the Maje women in each of the three worlds, all versions of which Milgrom has lived herself. Harper’s Bazaar spoke to the founder about her fondest memories of her childhood in the Middle East, an experience reimagined for the collection

Harper’s Bazaar: What was it like growing up in Morocco?
Judith Milgrom: I have such fond memories growing up in Morocco! I vividly remember the light, the bright colours, nature and especially bougainvillea. Life was so sweet in Morocco.

HB: Tell us what the fashion was like there?
JM: When I was growing up there wasn’t really fashion. There were only a few shops around but in my family, we weren’t shopping for fashion, we generally bought fabrics that my mother and grandmother would sew. At that time, craftsmanship was everywhere and I remember my grandmother changing patterns and colours of fabrics each season so she could make two different dresses herself, one for the daytime and another for cocktails and evenings.

HB: What do you miss about it?
JM: I miss the blue sky, the light, the mix of colours and above all the warm atmosphere. I lived my best years in Morocco... The years of a completely carefree attitude.

HB: How did Morocco inspire this collection?
JM: Morocco is very often a source of inspiration for me, especially in the choice and mixing bold colours and prints.

HB: How will the collection resonate with your Middle East customers?
JM: I hope that they will have fun with it and that they will appreciate its femininity and modernity.

Judith Milgrom

Judith Milgrom, founder of Maje

HB: Do you have a treasured piece in your wardrobe from Morocco?
JM: I have treasured memories of my father’s closet actually. He has always been very elegant and I remember wearing his shirts and even once I picked one of his black ties to wear. He was actually really angry and told me that I was wearing a tie that’s meant for a funeral. I still have these with me…

HB: Which is your favourite piece from the collection?
JM: I like the shirt dresses that are easy to wear and suit various occasions. I always try to offer versatile styles for a woman who lives several lives in the same day.

HB: How has the brand evolved over the past 20 years?
JM: Maje has evolved significantly, however it’s maintained its values, which are femininity, modernity, urbanity and versatility. In the end, Maje has evolved following the evolution of women’s lives.

HB: How has the 20th anniversary inspired the campaign?
JM: We wanted to look to the future not the past and youth is the future, so we worked with three young photographers in their twenties, who each expressed their individual vision for the brand and Maje woman in their own way. Each location tells a story: Morocco is the past, my roots; Paris is the present where Maje was founded; and London tells the story of our future.

HB: What do you hope for the brand in the next 20 years?
JM: I hope to continue to inspire women and make them feel beautiful, strong and confident in themselves.


From the March issue of Harper's Bazaar Arabia. Photography by Matthieu Salvaing

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In celebration of the brand’s 20th anniversary, Maje’s S/S18 campaign re-visits founder Judith Milgrom’s Moroccan childhood