Contemporary Artworks From Lehmann Maupin Find A New Home At The Peninsula New York

BY Rebecca Anne Proctor / Sep 23 2019 / 14:39 PM

The exhibition reflects The Peninsula Hotels’ global commitment to contemporary art and recalls its new multi-year global contemporary art programme called Art in Resonance

Contemporary Artworks From Lehmann Maupin Find A New Home At The Peninsula New York
Courtesy of The Peninsula New York
Catherine Opie’s haunting portraits in the upper lobby

A large tornado-like suspended sculpture made of 1200 cast resin piggybacked men dangles from the centre of the Peninsula New York’s lounge area. Made in acrylic, aluminium disc and stainless steel frame and cable, the work, Cause & Effect (2017) is by Korean artist Do Ho Suh.

At first glance the work seems out of place in the luxurious hotel replete with its subdued sleek furniture and glistening tableware. It’s one of the artist’s pieces of “fabric architecture” exploring the nature and meaning home.


A view of Do Ho Suh’s Cause & Effect  (2017) made in acrylic, aluminium disc and stainless steel frame and cable

Courtesy of The Peninsula New York

The work joined others this summer in the hotel’s Home exhibition in which it collaborated with private collectors and Lehmann Maupin gallery to stage a display throughout its public areas exploring the nature and notion of home and community.

Each work offers a welcome surprise and a feeling of calm to each space. Near the elevators there’s another work by Do Ho Suh made with pale green polyster fabric and stainless steel representing the frame of a small abode and recalling the artist’s own experience of arriving to the US and his perception of his new space.


A view of Ashley Bickerton’s The Edge of Things (1993)

Courtesy of The Peninsula New York

Upon entering the hotel guests are greeted with Ashley Bickerton’s The Edge of Things (1993) made after the artist relocated from New York to Bali. In the upper lobby, across from the front desk are paintings by Puerto Rican-born Angel Otero known for his multi-layered expressionistic compositions.

Catherine Opie’s haunting portraits also greet us in the upper lobby and make us stop and pause for a moment and question if the hotel isn’t another home. It could be. Bringing art into the public space offers new ways for guests to respond to the space as well as each other.  peninsula.com/newyork

From the Fall issue of Harper's Bazaar Interiors 2019.


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