7 Times Rosie Hungtington-Whiteley Talked About The #MeToo Movement On Our April Cover Shoot

Rosie Hungtington-Whiteley, April Cover, #MeToo, #TimesUp
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“There’s this sense that you can’t be feminine and tough at the same time and I think that’s incredibly sexist.”

On feeling ‘unprotected’ in her early modelling days…
“There’s definitely been instances where I’ve felt unprotected and moments where I found myself in situations that were uncomfortable. The fashion industry is so relaxed and casual, there’s this expectation on models that the more up for it you are, the better, the further you’ll go along in your career.”

On finding your voice and facing rejection…
“With modelling, it’s always been deemed as not a real career and there’s a lot of expectation on girls that the better the model you are, the quieter you are and the least amount of fuss you make. Over the last few years, what’s been really great for me is that I’ve managed to work myself into a position where I’m able to have my voice heard and work with people who want to empower me. But back in the early days, it was hard. It took me many years before I got any recognition. It was a long climb to get to where I am now. I pounded the pavement, I sat on the casting couch, I had a lot of rejection.”

On the #TimesUp movement…
Time’s Up is brilliant and it’s being led by some fantastic women. It is wonderful to see so many people’s stories coming to light. I’m pleased to be living in this era with this movement and these women.”

On the treatment of models at fashion week…
“For the first time some designers put private changing areas backstage at New York Fashion Week…I’ve done countless fashion shows where you’re in a room, undressing, photographers flying around, people with iPhones, all the crowd and audience coming after the show and you’re still half dressed, people are taking photographs of you whilst you’re getting changed. It blows my mind that that’s acceptable.”

On being a strong woman…
Unfortunately, when women are tough, they’re deemed as difficult. When they have an opinion, they’re deemed as being tricky to work with, or when they’re strong and speaking firmly, they’re a b***h, and I think that’s really disappointing. I know men don’t get that. Men are tough and it’s like, ‘Oh, we respect him as a businessman.’ There’s this sense that you can’t be feminine and tough at the same time and I think that’s incredibly sexist.”

On raising her son…
“I think it’s so much about raising boys and girls the same. I love the book by Chimamanda Ngozi,” We Should All Be Feminists, “I saw her TED talk and it was very inspiring. It’s about raising girls and boys with the same values; communication and respect. That’s how I was brought up, it’s how the people I love were brought up, and they are the values I hope to instil in my loved ones”

On advice for young women…
“Not to compromise! This is your career.”

Click here to read the full interview from the April issue of Harper's Bazaar Arabia

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Rosie Hungtington-Whiteley, April Cover, #MeToo, #TimesUp
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